"Each man has a song and this is my song." (Leonard Cohen)

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Hangman’s Knot (Columbia, 1952)


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Thanks.
Jeff




5 comments:

  1. This is a really satisfying Western....

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  2. The war dragged on in the west even after Lee surrendered. The last battle was in Texas and General Stand Watie surrendered in present day Oklahoma long after Lee in Virginia. I liked the scene where the baddie uses coal oil to light up his prisoner with the noose around his neck. Those are the little things that separate a great western from an okay one.

    Richard

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    1. Yes, and Stand Watie, or Degataga, was a fascinating character too. But I think Hollywood concentrated on the poignancy of the fact that the combatants didn't know the war was over, and their action even more futile and tragic.
      The coal oïl is a nice touch and full marks to Huggins for that, and others.
      Thanks for your comment.
      Jeff

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  3. You're right on with this. This is my very favorite Randolph Scott pre-Boetticher western. It makes me wish Roy Huggins had done more directing. Lee Marvin and Randolph Scott always seemed to play off each other well (as in Seven Men from Now).

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